Why Labour is losing the Hindu vote

– Written exclusively for Labour Uncut –

There is an expectation within the Labour Party that ethnic minorities will remain loyal to the cause come what may. They won’t. In fact, not only is Labour losing popular support amongst British Hindus, but the Tories are making significant inroads into this once rock solid demographic. The trend is reversible, but we need to act decisively in the coming months and years to shore up our vote with Britain’s half a million strong Hindu community.

First, it is important to understand that Hinduism isn’t just a religion, it is a way of life. There is a great deal more than just religious belief that binds the British Hindu population together. It is also worth pointing out that the British Hindu community is becoming increasingly confident, organised and influential, with the emergence of several major umbrella organisations and think tanks in recent years.

Younger second and third generation British Hindus are at the forefront of a progressive revolution within the community. Traditional socio-political trendsetters, such as priests and “community elders”, have been comprehensively replaced by the likes of property developers, high-flying lawyers, and well-connected business people. One of the unfortunate corollaries, however, is that it’s now no longer seen as unfashionable or disloyal to vote Conservative. In some naïve quarters, it has even become something of a status symbol.

The Tory brand has lost it’s racist connotation and aura of elitism. Instead, the Conservative Party has successfully revamped itself as the party of strong family values, educational attainment and success in business. All of which strikes a deep chord with the average British Hindu voter, and with younger professionals in particular. The Conservatives are acutely aware of the benefits that come with increased support from an aspirational British Hindu electorate. David Cameron’s recent Indian jolly was just the latest in a series of concerted efforts to capitalise on Labour’s complacency.

In 1997, just as the Tories were about to be decimated nationally, an organisation called the British Asian Conservative Link was set up to improve the image of the Tory Party and foster better relations with British Asian voters. Their current general secretary, Rickie Sehgal, is a fine example of how strategic thinking on the part of the Tories has helped to deliver support from prominent Hindus.

Since being appointed ethnic minorities officer for Leicester West CLP several weeks ago, I have been speaking to  movers and shakers in Britain’s growing Hindu community. What I’ve been hearing has not made for comfortable listening.

Take Sanjay Mistry for example, vice president and media spokesman for the Hindu forum of Britain. He told me that research carried out by the organisation prior to the election found that support for Labour had fallen significantly, to 27% for Labour, 26% for the Conservatives, 21% for the Liberal Democrats, and 21% undecided.

The Hindu Forum of Britain also found that voting among British Hindus had become much more issues-focused in recent years. Crime, education, healthcare and the economy were the top areas of concern, with little regard for Hindu-specific issues such as cremations and religious rights and freedoms. Sanjay also told me that in his opinion:

“Hindu voters are more likely to vote for Labour if their policies advocate improvements to the economy, increased jobs and support for businesses. Should the Labour party move backward and more to the left, I believe they will lose support from the Hindu community.”

And I had similar responses from others. This from Sanjay Jagatia, Secretary General of the National Council of Hindu Temples (UK):

“In the early years the Labour government built strong links with the Hindu community, but in later years Hindus were marginalised and ignored. There was less effort and investment in engaging with the Hindu community compared to other faith communities. The economy was one of the biggest issues for Hindu voters at the last election and it remains so. I think that Hindu business leaders, entrepreneurs and economists are already more likely to support the Conservative party, and the Conservatives are generally gaining support from British Hindus.”

Kapil Dudakia, respected columnist and adviser to a number of Hindu organisations, is much more blunt in addressing why Labour has been losing support from British Hindus:

”The Hindu community has given Labour a lot of goodwill over many decades and many elections. However there is now a clear sense that whilst votes are accepted by the party, when it comes to doing something for the Hindu community there appears to be little in the way of substance. We still have serious inequalities and a lack of representation in government departments and other public bodies, there is comparatively limited support and capital funding for voluntary Hindu organisations, and there remains a distinct lack of Hindus being selected by Labour to stand in winnable seats, to name a few examples. Labour would do well to address these concerns by moving forwards into 2010 and beyond, rather than going back to the 1970s.”

So the message to Labour from British Hindus is clear. The issues which matter most to British Hindus are the same ones that matter to everybody else: health, education, crime, the economy. If you get these issues wrong, British Hindus will not support you. When it comes to Hindu-specific issues, though – like funding for community organisations and the selection of Hindu PPCs in Labour seats – British Hindus feel neglected and taken for granted.

Nevertheless, British Hindus still retain tremendous goodwill towards Labour. There is a shared history which still resonates. The party still starts every election with an advantage. But it is an advantage which Labour needs to work much harder to convert into votes. Labour needs to embrace the community again, engage with it directly and show it some respect. It’s not too late to stop the British Hindu slide away from Labour. But it soon will be.

4 thoughts on “Why Labour is losing the Hindu vote

  1. Sundip

    Excellent post….the comments on the Hindu vote also apply to the Sikh vote.

    Many young British born Sikhs no longer agree with Labour as the only choice-Why should we vote Labour…… the only progressive solution is to have a larger selection of British born asian candidates….Can Obama happen in the U.K…if not why not?

  2. Sundip

    Your article has succinctly focused on how the Hindu political thinking has changed over the recent years and is changing- fast.

    Back in the 60’s I worked in a textile mill as a labourer. Almost all mill workers there, white or black, voted for Labour, always taking for granted that it was the only Party for them which would improve their ‘lower social class’ status.

    But the settlement problems which faced the hardworking Hindu community in the early days have gone by now. Today, our elders, whether literate or not, are keen to promote the education of their children and we now see that nearly all Hindu parents will want their children to aspire to at least university education. And it is these youths, having lived through the difficulties of their parent’s times, are making the difference in their socio-political thinking. They now want to play an active part in wanting to shape the politics of this country, and rightly so, having been born and bred here. I, too, have gone away from Labour and become more ‘conservative’ now as a typical Hindu inherently always has been.

  3. It has always puzzled me why anyone with the “hard working business and enterprise” oriented mind, which is typical of many people of South Asian ethnicity, should have ever supported Labour as they should have been “natural” supporters of Conservatives. I can understand that they had a suspicion of the Tory blue rinse brigade being racist, but then you will find that the typical Labour supporting Union members have always been racist in the privacy of their own homes. As you are generalising in your article, let me take your reference in particular to “Hindu” votes. I think it illustrates how the word “Hindu” is taken as a synonym for “Indian”. The “Hindu” or “Indian” caste system is just “racism” of the worst kind. At least the UK born and bred generation of South Asians, born in “Hindu” families, are now increasingly athiests and only pay lip service to the idea of being Hindu. We should all take heed of Richard Dawkins and stop using religion to separate us as UK citizens. We are all human beings who should celebrate the chance (as in probability) that we live in a free society.

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